All of the baseline samples for air and soil in and around Camp Minden came back clean with the exception one area on S-line, Environmental Protection Agency officials say.

Adam Adams, on-scene coordinator with the EPA, explained the baseline results sent out to property owners where the monitoring stations were set in May. During an EPA meeting at Camp Minden Thursday, he says all the results from seven different sites came back clean with the exception of two soil samples that exceeded carcinogenic screening levels for both residential and industrial. Those same samples tested for dioxin did not exceed non-carcinogenic screening levels.

“They’re high, but that’s industrial numbers in an industrial zone,” he said, adding S-line is the only soil sample that came back with any detections.

S-line is an old line used during the days of the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant.

Dr. Robert Flournoy, Delores Blalock, Ron Hagar and Dr. Brian Salvatore listen intently as the Environmental Protection Agency and representatives from Explosive Service International present the baseline data from air and soil samples taken from in and around Camp Minden.  Michelle Bates/Press-Herald
Dr. Robert Flournoy, Delores Blalock, Ron Hagar and Dr. Brian Salvatore listen intently as the Environmental Protection Agency and representatives from Explosive Service International present the baseline data from air and soil samples taken from in and around Camp Minden. Michelle Bates/Press-Herald

Monitoring stations were set up at Camp Minden (three locations), the Doyline water tower, Lakeside Jr./Sr. High School, Minden fairgrounds, the Dixie Inn Fire Department, Haughton High School and Princeton Middle School.

The 17-page report covers a wealth of information regarding air and soil samples with charts showing the time intervals samples were taken, the different chemicals they were testing for in the air and soil and where these samples were taken.

Adams also went over how the data is compiled on the EPA’s website. They have uploaded an interactive story map that shows where stations were set up and the corresponding information on a scroll board next to the map.

Once the M6 destruction begins, daily and weekly monitoring results will be uploaded to an infographic on the website to simplify the information as it becomes available to the public.

As results come in from ESI, Adams says, it will be turned over to the Louisiana Military Department, who will then turn it over to the EPA for public dissemination.

Health concerns, getting public health information regarding cancer statistics and other questions were raised during the meeting as well. Some in attendance said they were frustrated with the speed at which the government was able to get information to the public regarding public health.

Delores Blalock, a member of the EPA’s Citizens Advisory Group and Camp Minden dialogue committee, says she came away a little disappointed because CAG is searching for grants to fund a public health survey, and they were told the survey they want to do wouldn’t be worth anything.

“We know what needs to be done, and we have to figure out how to do it fast for no money,” she said, adding that the grant process takes more time than they have.

As sampling continues and community members continue to seek answers, construction at the M6 disposal site the contained burn unit continue.

Rep. Gene Reynolds posted an update after he says he received several inquiries about the construction progress. Officials say in the update he received Tuesday, the foundation at

Camp Minden is 90 percent complete and several units of the pollution abatement portion of the contained burn unit have been delivered to Camp Minden or are nearby.

The combustion chamber is projected to leave Oklahoma around Dec. 1 with the estimated arrival date at Camp Minden of Dec. 23 at the earliest.

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