Home News-Premium Minden Fire Dept. addresses heater safety

Minden Fire Dept. addresses heater safety

Minden firefighter Wesley Mandino, right, is learning the controls of the department’s new aerial feature on its newest fire truck while his fellow firefighters hook up a hose in preparation for putting the new equipment through its paces.

Temperature drop poses risks to some

As we go into Fall, some people will be turning on the heat in their homes. There are some safety tips to keep in mind as the temperatures begin to drop.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates 25,000 residential fires and 300 deaths every year are caused by space heaters.

“Space heaters do not need to have anything in front of them. It doesn’t need to be by any curtains or furniture. It needs to be in an open area.” Fireman Tyler Mandino said.

Space heaters should not be plugged into an overloaded socket, which can also cause fires.

Furnaces can often cause concern at the beginning of the season, however Tyler says they usually aren’t a cause for concern.

“When they turn them on the first time it’s going to stink really bad. A lot of people will call us on that and think it’s burning. But pay attention anyway so it doesn’t catch on fire, of course.” Tyler Advised

“The furnaces most likely, will have a lot of dust build up that can cause a lot of issues if it’s not serviced by a service technician.” Captain Wesley Mandino said.

Both firemen advise everyone with a fireplace to get them cleaned each year before use.

“Make sure your fireplace has been cleaned or you may have an issue where any build up can cause a crack in your brick chimney which could cause a lot of damage to your house or a fire,” Wesley said, “Also make sure you use a screen in front of your fireplace to keep embers from flying into your living room.”

Tyler advises people never to use their stove to heat their home.

“Your stove is not good because it puts off carbon monoxide. A space heater can also put off some carbon monoxide so everyone needs a carbon monoxide detector,” Tyler said.

Wesley also advises that carbon monoxide doesn’t have a smell so if a detector goes off, residents should open the doors and windows, get out of the house, and call the Fire Department.

Tyler wants the community to know the Fire Department is available for assistance.

“For the elderly, especially, if they have carbon monoxide detectors or smoke detectors that they need set up, they can call us or come by here and we’ll set them up for them,” Tyler advises.

Minden residents can contact the Fire Department at 318-371-4232.