Chickenstock 2016

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With a new nature trail, arts and crafts, food and fun, Chickenstock was once again a success.

Cultural Crossroads Executive Director Chris Broussard says this year’s Kids Day at The Farm was more successful than previous years, because they were able to expose a large number of children to the arts last week.

She says this year’s festival showed that not only are they providing art experiences for small children but for adults as well, adding it gives people a way to express themselves, and art is more than just drawing and painting.

Kids piece together art projects at Saturday's 22nd Annual Chickenstock. Under the big red tent, children of all ages had their choice of art stations and games to play. Michelle Bates/Press-Herald
Kids piece together art projects at Saturday’s 22nd Annual Chickenstock. Under the big red tent, children of all ages had their choice of art stations and games to play. Michelle Bates/Press-Herald
“The parents are realizing they are wanting to find their voice in the arts, and so we’re trying to bring more of that in so the adults can explore and find ways of expressing themselves creatively,” she said.

The festival, she says, was a good one despite the weather that threatened to dampen the outdoor event.

“This year’s festival was the best layout we’ve ever had,” she said. “I think it’s the best collection of fine arts, exhibitors and vendors we’ve ever had. While they were few in numbers, they were definitely quality.”

She says they are proud of the new nature trail and the painted door project.

“Personally, my mission was to introduce children to nature, because we’ll only take care of what we love,” she said. “We’re not doing a good job of taking care of this planet, and we’re leaving it to children who’ve not yet learned to love this planet and love Mother Nature.”

Zenobia's House was opened to the public for tours Saturday. The house is the homeplace of Zenobia West, who donated the four-acre property and house to Cultural Crossroads. Michelle Bates/Press-Herald
Zenobia’s House was opened to the public for tours Saturday. The house is the homeplace of Zenobia West, who donated the four-acre property and house to Cultural Crossroads.
Michelle Bates/Press-Herald
Bonnie Ferguson, a vendor who sold natural, homemade soaps, says Chickenstock is her favorite festival to attend.

“We go to a lot of festivals and out of all of them, this one is our favorite,” she said “It just has such a good vibe.”
Melissa Gruner, Junior Service League member, says they come out and help with the arts and crafts for the kids every year, and they all enjoy it.

“We love anything to do with children,” she said, “and any time we can volunteer, we do. With the music and arts and the kids, we love it.”

During the festival, people had a chance to explore the nature trail, hear the bird calling by Minden High School teacher John Dillion, a noted birder, and listen to poetry and music. The MHS band performed as well, showing off their musical talents as a group under the leadership of teacher Curtis Mills.

At the close of the festival, art contest winners were announced.

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