Following a week of testing, the kids can now put down their pencils and take a deep breath.

As soon as PARCC assessment testing was done, the numbers started rolling in as to how many students took the test statewide. Webster Superintendent of Schools Dr. Dan Rawls said he was pleased overall at the participation rate here.

“We had a 99 percent participation rate,” he said. “That said, in almost every school that tested, we had some that opted out.”

The students who opted out of taking the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers will receive a “0” on their test, which will reflect on the overall scores for the school and the district, Rawls says. However, he says he is proud.

“I am proud, because the message we send to Baton Rouge is we’re not afraid,” he said. “We’re about educating children.”

However, all the concerns that popped up about kids opting out of the PARCC test seem to be unfounded, as State Superintendent John White says 99 percent showed up Monday morning for exams.

“Today’s assessment gives a preliminary indication that concerns about widespread non-participation did not bear out,” White said.

The Common Core State Standards are a set of standards that dictate what students should know at which grade level.

White had concerns about only three parishes in the state in regard to test-taking rates: Jackson Parish at 87 percent, Red River Parish at 94 percent and Central Community School District at 92 percent, according to department numbers.

In a written statement, Gov. Bobby Jindal and his wife Supriya decided their children would take the test because he was afraid the state education department “would penalize our children’s school as a result of us choosing to opt them out of the test.”

The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education did not waive penalties for schools that had students who chose to opt out.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.