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Glynn Harris: Season changes are upon us

by Russell Hedges

Are you seeing it? Have you sensed it? Are you starting to get just a bit more spring in your step? If so, here’s a hint as to what is happening to put that spring in your step.

​Spring. We’re on the cusp of winter giving us the ragged remains of the season, finally giving way to this beautiful enchanted season of blossoms, blooms, green grass and emerging tender green leaves. 

​Be assured, we are not done with winter yet. There will still be frosty mornings and chilling north winds and we still have a few weeks before we celebrate March 19 as the date spring officially arrives, on the calendar, at least. 

My mom was one of those who kept an eye on the weather, especially if we have thunder in February. My calendar has two dates encircled for this year, February 10 and April 10. Mom always said that if it thunders in February, it will frost, or at least have a cold spell on that same day in April. Down through the years, I have kept up with it and although it doesn’t always frost in April on a date corresponding with the same date in February, there has just about always been a drop in temperatures within a few days of that date.

​Not all will be flowers and green grass as spring eases in. Our part of the country is blessed with millions upon millions of pine trees that provide shade for us all year long. These same pines we love for most of the year we will come to despise in a few weeks when dreaded yellow dust begins coating everything with pollen. Some complain that pine pollen causes them to start sneezing. It doesn’t. Pine pollen is not the culprit. Other plants emerging in spring that cause the sneezing and itching of eyes are rag weed and pollen from oaks and other hardwoods.

​Brushing aside the pine pollen, there is so many positive things greeting us when spring weather is actually here.

​This is the time of year when new birds begin showing up. The juncos, purple finches and white throated sparrows will be heading north where they’ll spend the summer nesting and rearing their families. They’ll be replaced by colorful indigo buntings, blue grosbeaks and if you’re really lucky, you might get a painted bunting to visit your feeder. There is no other bird adorned with such vibrant blue, red and bright green colors. There will also be those that stop over on their way north, the rose breasted grosbeak and Baltimore oriole along with a plethora of warblers of all description.

​For the hunter, spring is an enchanted season when the wild turkey begins to make its presence known. Even now in early March, hunters are already going out early mornings to listen for a gobbler on the roost and scouting for turkey sign. Hunting season opens April 6 but scouting and listening for gobblers is going on right now.

​Spring is also one of my favorite times of year for two basic reasons. I love to catch bluegills and I love them all crispy and fried on the platter. As water temperatures start to warm,,bluegills and chinquapins will move to the shallows to fan out beds where eggs will be deposited. This is the time of year when you can catch all you care to clean in one bedding area.

​Bass and crappie will also be moving onto shallow bedding areas to spawn and some real bragging sized bass and big slab crappie will be caught.

​One of my favorite things I like to do in Spring is to take my cup of coffee to the back porch early mornings, make sure my bird feeder is filled as I sit and sip and watch and attempt to identify birds. 

​I know that all sorts of bad scary stuff is going on in our country and around the world but it does a body good to push it all aside for a time to enjoy this special season the Good Lord gives us. Thank God for Spring.

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